World’s Number 1 Herbicide Discovered in U.S. Mothers’ Breast Milk


Originally posted on Family Survival Protocol - Microcosm News:


Drawing by Gonneke and released into public domain on Wikimedia Commons

The Cornucopia Institute logo and header

April 9th, 2014

Sustainable Pulse

  • Urine testing shows glyphosate levels over 10 times higher than in Europe
  • Initial testing shows Monsanto and Global regulatory bodies are wrong regarding bio-accumulation of glyphosate, leading to serious public health concerns
  • Testing commissioners urge USDA and EPA to place temporary ban on all use of Glyphosate-based herbicides to protect public health, until further more comprehensive testing of glyphosate in breast milk is completed.

In the first ever testing on glyphosate herbicide in the breast milk of American women, Moms Across America and Sustainable Pulse have found ‘high’ levels in 3 out of the 10 samples tested. The shocking results point to glyphosate levels building up in women’s bodies over a period of time, which has until now been refuted by both global regulatory authorities and the biotech industry.

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Curious Friday: Horned Oak Galls


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I not really sure why I find galls of all types so fascinating, but whenever I find one I’m always taking pictures of it. So be forewarned as the season gets under way, you’ll might be seeing more.
The picture above is a horned oak gall on a pin oak and as ugly as it is it is pretty cool and the fact the a tiny a cynipid wasp created it, is amazing.

“Horned galls Callirhytis cornigera, are abnormal growths or swellings comprised of plant tissue found on leaves, twigs, or branches. These deformities are caused by a tiny, non-stinging, wasp which produces a chemical or stimuli inducing the plant to produce large, woody twig galls. Most galls are aesthetically not pretty, but normally cause little damage to tree. However, severe infections may bring about the decline of the tree. Chemical control is seldom suggested for management.
Life cycle
“In early spring a tiny wasp of the cynipidae family emerge from woody stem galls. The females lay eggs on the veins of the oak leaf buds. Male and female wasps emerge from these tiny, blister type galls on the leaf vein about mid summer. Mated females deposit eggs in young oak twigs. The next spring small swellings develop on the twigs and enlarge over the next two or three years. The galls provide protection, food, and shelter for the developing larvae. When the larvae reach maturity, the horned galls developed small spines or horns. An adult wasp emerges from each horn and another life cycle of wasps begins.”

Weekly Photo Challenge: Monument


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You stand as a monument
No plaque attached
No Dedications
Only a few still remember
Some day
All that knew this gentle man
Who laid your roots in the ground
Will be gone
Your surroundings may change
Yet we might hope
That you will live on
To remember

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This scarlet oak was planted by a truly gentle man named Ray who live to almost 95. He was a remarkable plants-man, Landscaper and designer. I worked for him for many years and the oak was planted before I was even born. He built the house (top) and opened a nursery that was in business until he passed away, open for 60 years. After he was gone, the land was sold and the new owners wanted it turn it into medical practices park. Many of the trees are gone now, but I am happy they left this scarlet oak and I hope it is there for many generations to come.