Curious Friday On Saturday: Just Keep Blowing Bubbles


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Well it’s my 300th post, in the beginning, a little more than 2 years ago I would never have thought that I would do that many. I had once before posted some of my writings on another blog space, it just sort out there, somewhere. Yet at Word Press I have met some very interesting people who have very interesting life’s and are willing to share it. I have been to places I will never get to visit. Been given ideas and thoughts that I never would have thought of on my own.

So thank you, to all of you who have visited my blog, with likes and comments. I’m sorry for being really bad at replying, but life for me is one on the fly, with work and many volunteer commitments. So the time I do have I spend trying to keep up with all of you that I do follow which is about 600, all of your interesting thoughts, pictures and some humor along the way.

So I’ll just keep blowing bubbles, (do more posts that strike my fancy and hopefully you might find interesting,) like my friend the spittle bug. I have always been curious about how they make so many bubbles? How in their evolutionary history did one of these fellows think to blow bubbles as a means of hiding while it went about having a meal and why other spittle bugs figure it might be a good idea?

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Curious Friday: Horned Oak Galls


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I not really sure why I find galls of all types so fascinating, but whenever I find one I’m always taking pictures of it. So be forewarned as the season gets under way, you’ll might be seeing more.
The picture above is a horned oak gall on a pin oak and as ugly as it is it is pretty cool and the fact the a tiny a cynipid wasp created it, is amazing.

“Horned galls Callirhytis cornigera, are abnormal growths or swellings comprised of plant tissue found on leaves, twigs, or branches. These deformities are caused by a tiny, non-stinging, wasp which produces a chemical or stimuli inducing the plant to produce large, woody twig galls. Most galls are aesthetically not pretty, but normally cause little damage to tree. However, severe infections may bring about the decline of the tree. Chemical control is seldom suggested for management.
Life cycle
“In early spring a tiny wasp of the cynipidae family emerge from woody stem galls. The females lay eggs on the veins of the oak leaf buds. Male and female wasps emerge from these tiny, blister type galls on the leaf vein about mid summer. Mated females deposit eggs in young oak twigs. The next spring small swellings develop on the twigs and enlarge over the next two or three years. The galls provide protection, food, and shelter for the developing larvae. When the larvae reach maturity, the horned galls developed small spines or horns. An adult wasp emerges from each horn and another life cycle of wasps begins.”

Weekly Photo Challenge: Threshold


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Sometimes it is the the images and words of others
That are woven into ones’ own experience
Patterns are form
Never able to go back
A different view of the world
Beyond what any one person could live
Of good and bad, but hopefully never indifferent
Stepping over the thresholds
Knowing that one can never know all that is
Yet, maybe being able to see some things a little clearer

The Naked Planet


Many years ago (1958 -63) there was a TV show called the “Naked City” a police show about New York city and the opening lines were
“There are eight million stories in the Naked City.
This has been one of them”

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We live on a planet with trillions of living things from the unseen microorganisms to us, to large mammals, to the great whales and the towering redwood trees.

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Sometimes I wish each and all of their stories could be told and maybe we and the rest of life would live in another better place.

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